Other Federal Agencies, People

Nicely done! Nicely takes over as ODNI CIO while Gorman is on leave

The irrepressible Bob Brewin reports over on NextGov that Sherrill Nicely, deputy chief information officer at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, “has assumed the role of acting CIO while Patrick Gorman, the acting CIO, is on leave. ODNI did not say why Gorman was on leave or for how long.”

Gorman was acting CIO. Does that mean that Nicely is now the acting acting CIO?

Standard
Cyberdefense and Information Assurance, Other Federal Agencies, tech

NIST puts head into cloud computing

FCW reports that NIST is assembling a cloud computing team to develop ways to assess the security of applications built with a cloud computing architecture.

“The team will give our customers a sense of what kinds of risks they may be taking on by moving into that new territory,” [Ron Ross, a senior computer scientist and information security researcher at NIST] said today at the SaaS/Gov 2009 conference produced by the Software and Information Industry Association and market research firm Input.

Standard
Contractors & Vendors, Defense Department, tech

A different sort of virtual ride in Orlando – Army RVSs

The Army just gave Lockheed Martin’s Orlando operation a contract to provide vehicle simulators and tactical trainers. Here’s the DOD announcement:

Lockheed Martin Corp., Orlando, Fla., was awarded on Feb. 23, 2009, a $30,524,017 firm fixed price with time and materials CLINS contract to exercise Lot II option for a quantity of 3 Reconfigurable Vehicle Simulators (RVS) and 7 Reconfigurable Vehicle Tactical Trainers (RVTT’s) and associated weapons training. Work is to be performed at Orlando, Fla., with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2010. A sole source bid was solicited with one bid received. Program Executive Office Simulation, Training and Instrumentation, Orlando, Fla., is the contracting agency (W900KK-07-D-0707).

Standard
Defense Department, tech

Air Force, Army leaders lay out joint UAS future

The Air Force and Army try to get their large UAS acts together with “Task 11”, a concept of how to go forward with unmanned aerial systems in both services.

The Army has been hot to get its own UASs dedicated to frontline units, to forward deploy them for both C4ISR missions and as potential supporting weapons platforms. The Air Force recently created a whole UAV pilot career track, as Air Force leaders see UAVs as a rapidly growing part of the Air Force mission–and are putting rated pilots in charge of them.

The new “concept” unifies how the Air Force and Army TRADOC look at UASs, which means that there should be a bit less confusion about whose Raptor or Predator is dropping what on who.

Standard
Other Federal Agencies, Policy

DHS Cyber-czar says Federal cyber goals would be nice, thanks

Ron Beckstrom, director of DHS’s national security center, told Homeland Security conference attendees that “the end state (of a cyber security effort) is not adequately discussed”, and that the Federal government needs to set some concrete goals.”Do we want a stable Internet for commerce, for communication, for intelligence, for information-sharing or for the warfighter to have an electronic advantage in war? We need clearer directives.”

Standard
Uncategorized

Sorenson repeats his call for “blackberry-like” tools during Baghdad speech

Army CIO LTGEN Jeffrey Sorenson spoke at a meeting of AFCEA Baghdad today, and repeated his call for a unified, universal information service for soldiers that would give them “a universal data storage point, with one phone number, e-mail, and one set of collaborative tools that will not change, even when one physically moves, and will be effective anywhere in the world.” Sorenson has made this goal part of nearly every major address he’s made in the last year, as he steers the Army toward a Network Service Center model for IT–essentially moving the Army’s networks toward a cloud computing model.
From the Multinational Force Iraq press desk:

Lt. Gen. Sorenson began by saying to the group, “When it comes to
information, it is not what you know, it is what you share.” He added, “The U.S. Army is transforming what its IT network will look like by developing a better expeditionary capability and by having the ability to establish collaboration as a way of doing business. The Army will be transitioning a lot of independent networks into a single network enterprise. In order to be effective, we in the United States have to be able to communicate with all our expeditionary forces. The current network we have is not a single enterprise and we have to do a lot to make it function to the expeditionary level.”

Also at the event were Iraqi Maj. Gen. Sa’ad Kadhum, Director General of Communications for the Ministry of Information; Brig. Gen. Aliwe Jassam, Director – Radio Repair Division; Brig. Gen. Mahmood Al-Anni from the Ministry of Information; Brig. Gen. Ahmed Hoan, Advanced First Responder Network Program Manager for the Ministry of Information; and Dr. Ali Taresh, Chief Information Officer for the Ministry of Defense.

Taresh asked what the Iraqi MOD could learn from the problems the MNF coalition had faced. Sorenson answered that “getting people to come to agreement on the governance and protocol and the network structure was a challenge. We now have a process where we have one single group that looks at the network structure.”

AFCEA’s Baghdad Chapter opened last November.

Standard
Contractors & Vendors, Defense Department

Sorenson repeats his call for "blackberry-like" tools during Baghdad speech

Army CIO LTGEN Jeffrey Sorenson spoke at a meeting of AFCEA Baghdad today, and repeated his call for a unified, universal information service for soldiers that would give them “a universal data storage point, with one phone number, e-mail, and one set of collaborative tools that will not change, even when one physically moves, and will be effective anywhere in the world.” Sorenson has made this goal part of nearly every major address he’s made in the last year, as he steers the Army toward a Network Service Center model for IT–essentially moving the Army’s networks toward a cloud computing model.
From the Multinational Force Iraq press desk:

Lt. Gen. Sorenson began by saying to the group, “When it comes to
information, it is not what you know, it is what you share.” He added, “The U.S. Army is transforming what its IT network will look like by developing a better expeditionary capability and by having the ability to establish collaboration as a way of doing business. The Army will be transitioning a lot of independent networks into a single network enterprise. In order to be effective, we in the United States have to be able to communicate with all our expeditionary forces. The current network we have is not a single enterprise and we have to do a lot to make it function to the expeditionary level.”

Also at the event were Iraqi Maj. Gen. Sa’ad Kadhum, Director General of Communications for the Ministry of Information; Brig. Gen. Aliwe Jassam, Director – Radio Repair Division; Brig. Gen. Mahmood Al-Anni from the Ministry of Information; Brig. Gen. Ahmed Hoan, Advanced First Responder Network Program Manager for the Ministry of Information; and Dr. Ali Taresh, Chief Information Officer for the Ministry of Defense.

Taresh asked what the Iraqi MOD could learn from the problems the MNF coalition had faced. Sorenson answered that “getting people to come to agreement on the governance and protocol and the network structure was a challenge. We now have a process where we have one single group that looks at the network structure.”

AFCEA’s Baghdad Chapter opened last November.

Standard