Army, Contractors & Vendors, Defense Department, Harris, Marine Corps

Harris ships its 100,000th JTRS-approved handheld radio

From the release:

Harris Corporation (NYSE:HRS), an international communications and information technology company,today is delivering its 100,000th Falcon III(R) AN/PRC-152( C ), a multiband handheld radio that is providing improved secure real-time communication between deployed forces at all levels during combat and crisis.

The software-defined AN/PRC-152( C ) is the most widely deployed JTRS-approved radio. Currently in use by all branches of the DoD, many allies and U.S.
federal agencies, the radio was funded by Harris Corporation and is being procured under the JTRS Enterprise Business Model. This development work has also yielded the only JTRS-approved wideband networking radio available today, the Falcon III AN/PRC-117(G).

The 100,000th radio was presented to the U.S. Army in a ceremony at Harris RF Communications facilities in Rochester, New York. U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer, D-NY, joined Harris RF management and employees to celebrate the milestone.

“Congress, the DoD, Harris and the JTRS Joint Program Executive Office share
an unwavering commitment to get urgently needed networked communication
solutions to the field as quickly as possible,” said Dana Mehnert, Group
President, Harris RF Communications. “Harris Corporation is supporting this
imperative by delivering the JTRS-approved AN/PRC-152( C ) and the AN/PRC-117G manpack. These radios are in full production and are helping our armed
services field JTRS capabilities to address real-world missions today while providing the upgradeability to adapt to future standards and requirements.”

The multiband, multimission Falcon III AN/PRC-152( C ) radio is available in handheld and vehicular “grab-and-go” configurations and provides advanced communications interoperability to U.S. and allied forces, as well as federal agencies. The radio has significantly advanced the speed and reliability of voice-and-data communications on the battlefield.

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Defense Department, tech

More from the Software Radio Summit- SPAWAR's Richard Anderson

From my article in Defense Systems:

A senior Navy program manager challenged the software-defined radio (SDR) industry to think more like the PC industry.

Richard Anderson, senior program engineer and manager at the RF Communications Engineering Division of the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center in Charleston, S.C., specifically pointed to the need to deliver the types of features consumers have in their mobile phones.

“I don’t understand why troops in the field don’t have a cell phone like I do,” he said at the Institute for Defense and Government Advancement’s Software Radio Summit Feb. 24.

See Defense Systems for the rest of the story.

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tech

More from the Software Radio Summit- SPAWAR’s Richard Anderson

From my article in Defense Systems:

A senior Navy program manager challenged the software-defined radio (SDR) industry to think more like the PC industry.

Richard Anderson, senior program engineer and manager at the RF Communications Engineering Division of the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center in Charleston, S.C., specifically pointed to the need to deliver the types of features consumers have in their mobile phones.

“I don’t understand why troops in the field don’t have a cell phone like I do,” he said at the Institute for Defense and Government Advancement’s Software Radio Summit Feb. 24.

See Defense Systems for the rest of the story.

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Defense Department, tech

It's the cost, stupid, DOD's deputy asst. secretary for C3 says

[[update: be sure to look at the comments here for some sound defense of SCA.]]

Dr. Ronald Jost spoke this morning at the second day of the IDGA’s Software Radio Summit. The Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for C3 Space and Spectrum said essentially that there was a major disconnect between what industry saw as the advantage of software defined radios — the programmable radios capable of being configured for multiple types of communications and being upgraded via software– and what DOD wanted them for. While industry is dazzled by the potential to program all varieties of new custom waveforms, the DOD, he said, just wanted to use SDRs to help consolidate its communications networks toward a single, IP-based topology–and save some money on maintenance of the equipment.
Continue reading

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tech

It’s the cost, stupid, DOD’s deputy asst. secretary for C3 says

[[update: be sure to look at the comments here for some sound defense of SCA.]]

Dr. Ronald Jost spoke this morning at the second day of the IDGA’s Software Radio Summit. The Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for C3 Space and Spectrum said essentially that there was a major disconnect between what industry saw as the advantage of software defined radios — the programmable radios capable of being configured for multiple types of communications and being upgraded via software– and what DOD wanted them for. While industry is dazzled by the potential to program all varieties of new custom waveforms, the DOD, he said, just wanted to use SDRs to help consolidate its communications networks toward a single, IP-based topology–and save some money on maintenance of the equipment.
Continue reading

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