Uncategorized

Researchers craft network attack to “hack” surgical robot (sort of) | Ars Technica

Researchers craft network attack to “hack” surgical robot (sort of) University of Washington study tests the remote security risks of telemedicine. by Sean Gallagher – May 8, 2015 11:54am EDT Share Tweet 14 Have you ever performed surgery remotely and had someone try to jam you by drone? You will. UW BioRobotics Lab As part of a series of experiments, a group of researchers at the University of Washington’s BioRobotics Lab launched denial-of-service attacks against a remotely operated surgical robot,

Source: Researchers craft network attack to “hack” surgical robot (sort of) | Ars Technica

Standard
Uncategorized

WSJ website hacked, data offered for sale for 1 bitcoin | Ars Technica

A screenshot posted by “w0rm” showing he had dumped the user table from a Wall Street Journal database.

Dow Jones & Co. took two servers that store the news graphics for The Wall Street Journal website offline yesterday evening after a confirmed intrusion by a hacker calling himself “w0rm.” The hacker was offering what he claimed was user information and server access credentials that would allow others to “modify articles, add new content, insert malicious content in any page, add new users, delete users, and so on,” Andrew Komarov, chief executive officer of cybersecurity firm IntelCrawl, told The Wall Street Journal.

via WSJ website hacked, data offered for sale for 1 bitcoin | Ars Technica.

Standard
Uncategorized

NSA loves The Bahamas so much it records all its cellphone calls | Ars Technica

Documents obtained by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden show that the NSA has covertly intercepted and recorded nearly all of the calls made to, from, or between cell phones in The Bahamas. The surveillance, reported by The Intercept, used legal monitoring access obtained by the Drug Enforcement Administration.

via NSA loves The Bahamas so much it records all its cellphone calls | Ars Technica.

Standard
Uncategorized

NSA routinely tapped in-flight Internet, intercepted exported routers | Ars Technica

In his new book No Place to Hide, Glenn Greenwald revealed a number of additional details on the “craft” and tools used by the NSA and its British counterpart, the GCHQ. While many of the capabilities and activities Greenwald details in the book were previously published in reports drawing from Edward Snowden’s vast haul of NSA documents, a number of new pieces of information have come to light—including the NSA’s and GCHQ’s efforts to use airlines’ in-flight data service to track and surveil targeted passengers in real time.

The systems—codenamed “Homing Pigeon” by the NSA and “Thieving Magpie” by the GCHQ—allowed the agencies to track which aircraft individuals under surveillance boarded based on their phone data.

via NSA routinely tapped in-flight Internet, intercepted exported routers | Ars Technica.

Standard
Uncategorized

After 17-year march, Army still drags its boots on buying high-tech radios | Ars Technica

The US Army and other military services began development of software-defined radios to replace aging analog systems in 1997—long before Wi-Fi, broadband cellular, and high-definition television were even on the drawing board. The Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS) program was supposed to revolutionize battlefield communications, turning soldiers and vehicles into nodes in an all-digital network that allowed data and video to flow as easily as voice traffic.

Little did the people working on the JTRS program know that the product of their labors would take 20 years to start being deployed in volume to troops—and how little of the original scope of the program would ever make it into service. The Army just announced this month its roadmap for rolling out JTRS-based Handheld, Man-Pack, and Small Form Factor (HMS) program radio systems in volume—three years from now. That means it may be 2018 before most soldiers see the radios in the field.

On May 2, at Fort Bliss, Texas, the Army’s HMS program team conducted its first “terrain walk-around” test of the AN/PRC-155 Manpack Radio, General Dynamics’ backpack offering for the program. The tests were in advance of a Network Integration Evaluation test at White Sands—the same evaluation exercise where, in 2011, the Ground Mobile Radio program met its Waterloo. The Army cancelled the GMR program after those tests and after an investment of $6 billion.

via After 17-year march, Army still drags its boots on buying high-tech radios | Ars Technica.

Standard