Web Culture, work

Fun facts: My Wikipedia cites

When you write for Ars, it’s nice that people notice. And sometimes, they notice enough to cite you on Wikipedia.

Strangely, the first hit I get on Google when searching my Wikipedia cites is for my coverage of a bus company.

Suburban Express – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suburban_Express
Wikipedia

In early 2013, according to Ars Technica, Suburban Express had developed a “bad reputation online” from reviewers who …. Gallagher, Sean (May 2, 2013).

Wikipedia

This was confirmed by Sean Gallagher writing in Ars Technica and by others. However, no one else has confirmed the report that books never opened in ADE …

Wikipedia

Jump up ^ Sean Gallagher (Mar 12, 2015). “CryptoLocker look-alike searches for and encrypts PC game files”. Ars Technica. Retrieved 14 March 2015. Jump up …

Wikipedia

Sean Gallagher of Ars Technica commented that the key failure was the dependency on automated testing rigs, which “can’t show what the system’s …

Wikipedia

Ars Technica. Retrieved 2014-02-18. Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (2013-02-15). “Facebook computers compromised by zero-day Java exploit”. Ars Technica.

Wikipedia

“Point-of-sale malware infecting Target found hiding in plain sight”. Ars Technica. Retrieved November 8, 2014. Jump up ^ Sean Gallagher (September 18, …

Th3j35t3r – Cybersecurity Wiki

cyber.law.harvard.edu/…/Th3j35t…
Berkman Center for Internet & Society

Aug 8, 2012 – Sean Gallagher, “Patriotic hacktivist” The Jester unmasked—or maybe it’s a big troll, Ars Technica, May 15, 2012. Retrieved from …

Tailored Access Operations – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/Remote_Operations_Center
Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (2013-11-12). “Quantum of pwnness: How NSA and GCHQ hacked OPEC and others”. Ars Technica. Retrieved 2014-01-18.

RSA Security – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/RSA_Security
Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean. (2014-01-21) “TrustyCon” security counter-convention planned for RSA refusniks. Ars Technica. Retrieved on 2014-05-11. Jump up …

Tor (anonymity network) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/Tor_(anonymity_network)
Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (18 April 2014). “Tor network’s ranks of relay servers cut because of Heartbleed bug”. Ars Technica. Retrieved 28 April 2014.
October 22, 2013. Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (March 27, 2015). “A $50 device is breaking North Korean government’s grip on media”. Ars Technica. Jump up …

Project Narwhal – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/Project_Narwhal
Slate.com. Retrieved 12 November 2012. Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (Nov 9, 2012). “Inside Team Romney’s whale of an IT meltdown”. Ars Technica.

Computer security – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/Computer_insecurity
… Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (May 14, 2014). “Photos of an NSA “upgrade” factory show Cisco router getting implant”. Ars Technica. Retrieved August 3, 2014.

SourceForge – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/SourceForge.net
… Jump up ^ http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/05/sourceforge-grabs-gimp-for-windows-account-wraps-installer-in-bundle-pushing-adware/ …

Syrian Electronic Army – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/Syrian_Electronic_Army
Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (May 8, 2013). “Network Solutions seizes over 700 domains registered to Syrians”. Ars Technica. Retrieved October 15, 2014.
2010-04-06. Retrieved 2014-01-12. ^ Jump up to: Gallagher, Sean. “How IBM’s Deep Thunder delivers “hyper-local” forecasts 3-1/2 days out”. Ars Technica.

Random-access memory – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/Random_Access_Memory

Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean. “Memory that never forgets: non-volatile DIMMs hit the market”. Ars Technica. Jump up ^ Bellis, Mary. “The Invention of the Intel …

Kim Dotcom – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/Kim_Dotcom
Jump up ^ <http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/01/why-kim-dotcom-hasnt- … Kim Dotcom, 26 January 2012; Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (26 January 2012).

Ubuntu (operating system) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/Ubuntu_(Linux_distribution)
Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (20 November 2012). “How Team Obama’s tech efficiency left Romney IT in dust”. Ars Technica. Retrieved 4 December 2012.
Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (June 26, 2015). “Private investigator snooped on e-mail of Scientology critics [Updated]”. Ars Technica. Retrieved June 27, 2015.

Chubby Checker – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/Chubby_Checker
Archived from the original on 2008-02-09. Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (2013-02-14). “HP sued by Chubby Checker over webOS penis size app”. Ars Technica.

Megaupload – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/Megaupload
Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (30 January 2012). “Feds: Megaupload user files may be deleted starting Thursday”. Arstechnica. Archived from the original on …

UltraSPARC T1 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/UltraSPARC_T1
Jump up ^ Sean Gallagher (28 September 2011), “SPARC T4 looks to be good enough to stave off defections to x86, Linux”, arstechnica.com (Ars Technica) …

Microsoft Office 2013 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.com/wiki/Microsoft_Office_2013
Retrieved August 26, 2012. Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (July 16, 2012). “Office 2013: Microsoft’s bid to win the future”. Ars Technica. Retrieved June 7, 2013.

Seagate. Retrieved 3 November 2013. Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (27 October 2013). “Seagate introduces a new drive interface: Ethernet”. Arstechnica.com.

Naval aviation – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump up ^ Gallagher, Sean (23 April 2014). “Top Gun, robot-style: Navy moves ahead on carrier-based drone program”. arstechnica. Retrieved 24 March 2015.

Gordon Lyon – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon_Lyon
Wikipedia

Website, http://insecure.org/fyodor/ … Org — The top 100 network security tools (ranked by thousands of Nmap … Jump up ^ Sean Gallagher (4 June 2015). “Black “mirror”: SourceForge has now seized Nmap audit tool project”. Ars Technica.

That’s what I’ve found so far. Feel free to quote me.

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Administrivia, AOL, dot-communism, facebook, Technologies, Web Culture, Yahoo!

del.icio.us Wikileaks give me attention deficit disorder

Yahoo is apparently looking to release the social linking service del.icio.us into the wild (after never really finding a way to monetize it, I suspect, and finally deciding that Yahoo is not an Internet charity but in fact a business).  Of course, since it’s the vessel for a great deal of social content, there’s obviously been some concern–if you had spent the last decade storing all your favorite web bookmarks in a cloud service, you’d be kind of upset if they were to suddenly go poof, I’m sure.

I’m not a big del.icio.us user.  Back when I worked with a certain Gillmor, he raved something about del.icio.us and the “attention-economy” and what-not.  I found it to be interesting when combined with other social media of the time (I think we called them “blogs” back then), and it demonstrated itself to be innovative enough that it gained a few copycats along the way. But I had this other way of sharing bookmarks with friends: by posting them to my blog and tagging them.  That way, I owned the data, and it was searchable, and anyone who cared about what I thought could subscribe to my RSS feed or see it on my blog (or eventually on Facebook or Twitter). And I had permalinks and all that jazz. Oh, and I could do that for free with several blog platforms. But that wasn’t playing in the attention-stream, I was told.  I guess I have attention deficit disorder or something.

Fast forward 10 years.  We have so many cloud-based social media tugging at us, wanting us to connect to friends and share that del.icio.us has long been lost to most people in the din of Facebook this and Twitter that.   Del.icio.us has evolved a little, but other services like StumbleUpon and Reddit.  And, while some brave pioneers have hung around, the fickle masses have wandered on to other things.

No wonder Yahoo has gotten bored with del.icio.us and has labeled it “sunset”.   It’s that attention thing again, or a lack of it–people have stopped paying attention to what people pay attention to on del.icio.us and would now rather pay attention to what their friends are doing in Farmville.  And since  del.ico.us  lives at the whim of a provider, with no terms of service and no export tool other than code-scraping, there’s the potential for all the attention that’s been spent on curating del.icio.us — curating, the latest buzzword for collecting links –there’s the potential that it’s all been in vain, for naught, and bound for the bit bucket in the cloud.

Of course, that’s the whole problem with magical cloud services, anyway. There may be terms of service out there, but there is not a whole lot that looks like a binding contract between cloud provider and user.  I could wake up tomorrow and find that Yahoo has lost interest in Flickr, and all my photos from the last 5 years have evaporated into so many purged pixels with no contractual recourse than, say, a refund on what’s left of my annual pro fee.  Google could turn off my mail. Facebook could declare me dead and purge my page. Like the Maryland Lottery, it could happen to you.

Do I have your attention?

At least providers like WordPress let me back up and export my site, and I have the code to run the blog someplace else, where I own (or at least lease) the server. But if the cloud is going to be both a metaphor for where applications live and a description of the substantiveness of legal protection that we have as users of the thing from having our digital works exist or not at the whims of questionable business models, then we need to have a way to own our data and move it and replicate it to cover our pixilated assets.

Wikileaks adds new focus to that — it is a model of what data portability should be.  Government siezes your URL because you pissed them off? No problem! The Bolivians will gladly give you a domain, and you can mirror–because YOU own the data, and can move it or duplicate it at will.  Sure, it costs something — money, in WikiLeaks’ case, to pay for hosting and domains and lawyers to fight extradition. In your case, it might cost sharing some of your data, and maybe your…attention.  To advertisements, or to other people’s sites, or whatever.

We pay sites like Facebook with our attention and our data. Mark Z. and his crew keep our attention with new features, and extract value from our data and our ad views to pay the rent.  We should have the ability to take our social network data and replicate it elsewhere, both while we’re using Facebook and when we leave, because it’s part of our identity.  There’s phone number portability by law… why not data portability?

 

Standard
Administrivia, AOL, dot-communism, facebook, Technologies, Web Culture, Yahoo!

del.icio.us Wikileaks give me attention deficit disorder

Yahoo is apparently looking to release the social linking service del.icio.us into the wild (after never really finding a way to monetize it, I suspect, and finally deciding that Yahoo is not an Internet charity but in fact a business).  Of course, since it’s the vessel for a great deal of social content, there’s obviously been some concern–if you had spent the last decade storing all your favorite web bookmarks in a cloud service, you’d be kind of upset if they were to suddenly go poof, I’m sure.

I’m not a big del.icio.us user.  Back when I worked with a certain Gillmor, he raved something about del.icio.us and the “attention-economy” and what-not.  I found it to be interesting when combined with other social media of the time (I think we called them “blogs” back then), and it demonstrated itself to be innovative enough that it gained a few copycats along the way. But I had this other way of sharing bookmarks with friends: by posting them to my blog and tagging them.  That way, I owned the data, and it was searchable, and anyone who cared about what I thought could subscribe to my RSS feed or see it on my blog (or eventually on Facebook or Twitter). And I had permalinks and all that jazz. Oh, and I could do that for free with several blog platforms. But that wasn’t playing in the attention-stream, I was told.  I guess I have attention deficit disorder or something.

Fast forward 10 years.  We have so many cloud-based social media tugging at us, wanting us to connect to friends and share that del.icio.us has long been lost to most people in the din of Facebook this and Twitter that.   Del.icio.us has evolved a little, but other services like StumbleUpon and Reddit.  And, while some brave pioneers have hung around, the fickle masses have wandered on to other things.

No wonder Yahoo has gotten bored with del.icio.us and has labeled it “sunset”.   It’s that attention thing again, or a lack of it–people have stopped paying attention to what people pay attention to on del.icio.us and would now rather pay attention to what their friends are doing in Farmville.  And since  del.ico.us  lives at the whim of a provider, with no terms of service and no export tool other than code-scraping, there’s the potential for all the attention that’s been spent on curating del.icio.us — curating, the latest buzzword for collecting links –there’s the potential that it’s all been in vain, for naught, and bound for the bit bucket in the cloud.

Of course, that’s the whole problem with magical cloud services, anyway. There may be terms of service out there, but there is not a whole lot that looks like a binding contract between cloud provider and user.  I could wake up tomorrow and find that Yahoo has lost interest in Flickr, and all my photos from the last 5 years have evaporated into so many purged pixels with no contractual recourse than, say, a refund on what’s left of my annual pro fee.  Google could turn off my mail. Facebook could declare me dead and purge my page. Like the Maryland Lottery, it could happen to you.

Do I have your attention?

At least providers like WordPress let me back up and export my site, and I have the code to run the blog someplace else, where I own (or at least lease) the server. But if the cloud is going to be both a metaphor for where applications live and a description of the substantiveness of legal protection that we have as users of the thing from having our digital works exist or not at the whims of questionable business models, then we need to have a way to own our data and move it and replicate it to cover our pixilated assets.

Wikileaks adds new focus to that — it is a model of what data portability should be.  Government siezes your URL because you pissed them off? No problem! The Bolivians will gladly give you a domain, and you can mirror–because YOU own the data, and can move it or duplicate it at will.  Sure, it costs something — money, in WikiLeaks’ case, to pay for hosting and domains and lawyers to fight extradition. In your case, it might cost sharing some of your data, and maybe your…attention.  To advertisements, or to other people’s sites, or whatever.

We pay sites like Facebook with our attention and our data. Mark Z. and his crew keep our attention with new features, and extract value from our data and our ad views to pay the rent.  We should have the ability to take our social network data and replicate it elsewhere, both while we’re using Facebook and when we leave, because it’s part of our identity.  There’s phone number portability by law… why not data portability?

 

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Adobe eBook, amazon, Android, Apple, Apps for Grownups, Barnes & Noble, E-book readers, eBooks, Google, iPad, iPhone, iPod, Kindle, Nook, Web Culture

Google Jumps Into E-Books (Just in Time for Christmas)

 

After a rocky start with the book publishing industry, Google has finally launched its own online e-bookstore. And it promises to shake up the universe of e-books, currently dominated by Amazon and Barnes & Noble. With the backing of over 4,000 publishers, Google’s eBooks starts off with what the company calls the world’s largest collection of e-books—including nearly 3 million that are free.

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