Air Force, drones

US sends its giant spy drone to look for kidnapped Nigerian girls | Ars Technica

The drone that the United States Air Force sees as the replacement for the venerable U-2 spy plane is now flying surveillance missions over Nigeria as part of the search for 276 schoolgirls kidnapped by the Boko Haram terrorist group. A Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk flew a mission over Nigeria on Tuesday, according to an NBC News report.

The Global Hawk, which first flew in 1998, can stay airborne for up to 28 hours and has a range of 8,700 miles. It has a wingspan close to that of a Boeing 747, weighs more than 32,000 pounds, and carries the Hughes Integrated Surveillance and Reconnaissance (HISAR) sensor system, a down-market version of the infrared, optical, and synthetic aperture radar gear Hughes developed for the U-2.

via US sends its giant spy drone to look for kidnapped Nigerian girls | Ars Technica.

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Air Force, Cyberdefense and Information Assurance, Defense Department, DISA

In C4ISR Journal – Cyber Defense Overhaul

U.S. defense officials are insisting that by reorganizing their cybersecurity strategy to give new powers to the director of the National Security Agency, they are not attempting a power grab. The military will continue to focus on protecting its own networks, they said, rather than expanding the military’s role to protecting civilian-run electrical and transportation networks.

Still, the changes the Pentagon has announced for the next 16 months will be significant. The heightened role of the NSA will be reflected in a fourth star. From now on, the NSA director will be either a four-star admiral or general, and this person will lead a new U.S. Cyber Command, dubbed CyberCom, wrote Defense Secretary Robert Gates in a June 23 memo to military leaders.

Read the rest at:  Cyber-overhaul – C4ISRJournal.com – Military Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance.

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Air Force, BAE Systems

BAE brought in to deal with “vanishing vendors” for F-15 radar warning system

BAE Systems Information and Electronics of Totowa, New Jersey was awarded a $5,963,688 contract which will provide engineering services to resolve obsolete part and vanishing vendor issues with the LRU-3c low band receiver and digital processor, part of the of the AN/ALR-56C radar warning system of the F-15 fighter, and significantly improve the system availability of the LRU-3C. The AN/ALR-56C is aboard all of the Air Force’s F-15 aircraft, as well as those of the Royal Saudi Air Force.

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Air Force, BAE Systems

BAE brought in to deal with "vanishing vendors" for F-15 radar warning system

BAE Systems Information and Electronics of Totowa, New Jersey was awarded a $5,963,688 contract which will provide engineering services to resolve obsolete part and vanishing vendor issues with the LRU-3c low band receiver and digital processor, part of the of the AN/ALR-56C radar warning system of the F-15 fighter, and significantly improve the system availability of the LRU-3C. The AN/ALR-56C is aboard all of the Air Force’s F-15 aircraft, as well as those of the Royal Saudi Air Force.

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Air Force, Northrop Grumman

B-52 electronic warfare suite gets $25.7 million in support

The Air Force’s 542nd Combat Sustainment Group, which is responsible for purchasing support for all Air Force electronic warfare systems, has given Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., of Rolling Meadows, Ill.,  a $25,739,773 contract to provide electronic warfare engineering services for the B-52H.  Northrop built the AN/ALR-46 digital warning receiver for the B-52, whic detects radar emissions in the 2GHz to 18GHz band, and can simultaneously identify up to 16 radar signals; and the Northrop Grumman’s AN/ALQ-155 jammer power management system, which gives the aircraft gives 360° coverage in D,E,F,G, and H radar bands.

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Air Force, Contractors & Vendors, Lockheed Martin, Navy, Sensors, weapons systems

Hawker Beechcraft and Lockheed team on USAF light armed recon aircraft bid

The Air Force and Navy have both been investigating the idea of a return to propeller-driven aircraft for “irregular warfare” support — something that can provide both ISR for special forces on the ground with a long on-station time, and quick close air support when the need arises.  The Navy reportedly was looking at the Brazilian-made Super Tucano for that role (though the Super Tucano is not carrier-launch capable).

In July, the Air Force’s Air Combat Command issued a presolictation “capability request” for a Light Attack/Armed Reconnaissance (LAAR) aircraft.  Now Hawker Beechcraft and Lockheed Martin have joined forces to put together a bid based on H/B’s T-6 Navy and Air Force trainer.

The AT-6, a hardened version of the T-6, is in prototype phase — a prototype successfully completed its first test flight on September 10.

From the release:Hawker Beechcraft Corporation

(HBC) and Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] have teamed to compete for the opportunity to

provide a low-cost, low-risk solution to address U.S. Air Force (USAF) needs for a Light

Attack and Armed Reconnaissance (LAAR) aircraft. The USAF is expected to launch an

acquisition program in fiscal year 2010.

HBC, based in Wichita, Kan., will be prime contractor and Lockheed Martin Systems

Integration in Owego, NY, will be the mission systems integrator for the Beechcraft AT-6

LAAR aircraft. The AT-6 will be a product of the combined heritage and expertise of the

two companies, leveraging the existing worldwide fleet of Hawker Beechcraft T-6 aircraft

that recently passed the one million flying hour milestone, with the proven missions

systems integration expertise of Lockheed Martin.


Related links:

Hawker Beechcraft | Military/Trainer

Lockheed/Hawker joint release

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